Category Archives: Delray Beach

Varieties of Florida Croton

Florida croton

                   Florida croton

There are seventeen varieties of the croton plant in Florida and other areas with subtropical climates.  The croton is generally salt tolerant and thrives in alkaline soils.  Croton grows relatively slowly and requires little care and maintenance.

 

 

 

 

Dipper dredge in the cut near Delray Beach

Dipper dredge in a difficult “dry” cut near Delray Beach. The dipper dredge used an A-frame for stability. Long posts on the corners were driven into the bottom of what appears to be shallow water. The dipper scooped up the bottom consisting of soil and rock, depositing the spoil on either side and building up high banks. Attached to the A-frame the dipper could swing to either side. Dredges often ran 24 hours a day, lit by lamps burning acetylene gas (a combination of calcium carbide and water, but often an explosive one). Accounts indicate that dredge workers ate well, supplied with Chicago beef in Florida’s wild terrain. Native fare would have been wild turkey, fish, and vegetables). Settlers in what were the settlements of Delray and Boynton included farmers from Michigan led by promoters William Seelye Linton and Major Nathan Boynton. Courtesy, State Archives of Florida, Tallahassee, Fla. </

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One of the older steamboats plying the waters of what was then called the Florida East Coast Canal, the “Courtney” carried mostly passengers on short trips along the Florida East Coast in the 1890’s. Henry Flagler, then president of both the Florida East Coast Railway and the Florida canal company, cruised into Miami on the “Courtney” (also called the “Sweeney”) just before he arrived in Miami in one of his FEC Railway cars on April 13, 1896. Upon completion of the railway,Flagler liquidated his holdings in the Florida canal company and resigned as president. For the next thirty years, the Florida canal company and Flagler’s Florida East Coast Railway would compete for passengers and freight in providing transportation down the east coast of Florida. And both companies would compete for settlers buying the millions of acres of state land the Florida legislature promised these two companies for extending transportation into the southern tip of the Florida peninsula.